• Crisis in Mexico's MEGACITY

    Mexico's vast capital — Ciudad de México, the largest city in the Americas — is under threat from a severe water crisis...and vulnerable to disasters like the earthquake that struck on September 19, 2017. Subscribe to TDC: https://www.youtube.com/TheDailyConversation/ More information here: http://nyti.ms/2kFT35m Video by Bryce Plank and Robin West Music from Motion Array's library Like TDC on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/thedailyconversation Follow TDC on http://www.twitter.com/thedailyconvo Transcript: What makes this place unique? It is the world’s largest city at an elevation higher than 2000 meters. With 21.2 million residents it rivals New York City for the title of largest metropolis in the Americas, and it is one of the world’s oldest continuously populated urban areas. B...

    published: 27 Jul 2017
  • Mexico City faces growing water crisis

    Mexico City, home to an inefficient and inconvenient water delivery system, struggles to meet the pressing demands of its 22 million residents. Some residents have turned to harvesting rainwater, which has its own set of limitations. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports on the barriers that keep residents from clean water.

    published: 11 Nov 2014
  • Mexico City hit hard by water shortages

    More than two million people have been affected by water shortages across Mexico’s capital. Ageing infrastructure and a booming population are forcing people to live along the hillsides around Mexico City as they are dependent on water that is driven in on trucks. There are also fears of more taps running dry as the hottest time of the year approaches. Al Jazeera’s David Mercer reports from Mexico City. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/

    published: 14 Mar 2017
  • Mexico City is Sinking

    Mexico city is sinking because people are thirsty. The city has sunk dozens of feet in the last 60 years because 70 percent of the water people rely on is extracted from the aquifer below. This has caused buildings to lean and sink into the ground at a rate of up to one foot a year in the most extreme places. Fusion visited three historical sites in the city to learn more.

    published: 29 Feb 2016
  • Roger Waters - "Pigs (Three Different Ones)"

    The resistance begins today. Live from Zócalo Square - Mexico City - October 1, 2016

    published: 21 Jan 2017
  • Mexico City struggles to provide public with clean water

    Every major country faces the challenge of providing safe, drinkable water to its cities. This struggle is greatly magnified in Mexico, home to one of the world's most vast megacities. CGTN's Franc Contreras reports from Mexico City.

    published: 23 Mar 2017
  • Mexico City Water

    Mexico city water problem and history.

    published: 15 Dec 2015
  • Mexico City is Sinking | Channel One News

    Tom Hanson fills us in as Mexico City faces a big problem. For more Channel One News updates subscribe to Channel One News: https://www.youtube.com/user/ChannelOneNews Visit the Channel One News Website: http://www.channelone.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ChannelOneNews/ Twitter: @ChannelOneNews Instagram: @channelonenews Channel One News is the leading news program for young people across the country. Now in its 27th season, the dynamic, daily news show covers domestic and international news stories from a relevant young person’s perspective. Teachers: For daily, supplementary curriculum content tied to each day’s show and access to our video library of more than 2,200 videos, head over to http://www.channelone.com/subscribe/.

    published: 27 Sep 2016
  • Tenochtitlan (The Impossible City)

    Tenochtitlan was a city-state located on an island in Lake Texcoco in the Valley of Mexico. Founded in 1325, it became the seat of the growing Aztec Empire in the 15th century, until it was captured by the Spanish in 1521. Today the ruins of Tenochtitlan are located in the central part of Mexico City.

    published: 08 Jan 2011
  • Sewer Diving in Mexico City - Supersized Earth - Episode 1 - BBC One

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0114dtq Mexico City is in danger of drowning in its own filth. Dallas joins one of the men responsible for keeping its sewers flowing freely.

    published: 24 Nov 2012
  • Sewer Diving | National Geographic

    Meet the man who swims through human excrement, toxic waste, and rotting cadavers to keep Mexico's wastewater where it belongs. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta Sewer Diving | National Geographic https://youtu.be/TlRjbV-rT-E National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo

    published: 01 Sep 2009
  • Mexico City's water farms

    ► Subscribe to the Financial Times on YouTube: http://bit.ly/FTimeSubs Small producers are growing crops in fertile soil around the city's ancient waterways. Deborah Bonello reports. Special report: http://www.ft.com/reports/future-food-industry For more video content from the Financial Times, visit http://www.FT.com/video Subscribe to the Financial Times on YouTube; http://goo.gl/vUQx5k Twitter https://twitter.com/ftvideo Facebook https://www.facebook.com/financialtimes

    published: 21 Nov 2013
  • Mexico City's tap water made me sick

    http://preparetoserve.com/MEXICO Mexico City's tap water made me sick. Sometimes tourists or foreigners get sick when drinking the water in Latin American countries. Their water is now always treated the same way as in the United States.

    published: 14 Nov 2013
  • Abandoned Water Park Atlantis - Mexico City !

    Follow mike! https://www.youtube.com/user/friskyb music - http://www.epidemicsound.com/ FOLLOW MY SOCIAL MEDIA facebook = https://www.facebook.com/exploringwithjosh Snapchat = exploringjosh Twitter = https://twitter.com/i_am_joshyo instagram = https://www.instagram.com/exploringwithjosh !!!! MY GEAR !!!! MY BACKPACK - http://amzn.to/2ifBf0f MY Camera ( a7s2 ) - http://amzn.to/2hPVRji MAIN Lens to vlog with - http://amzn.to/2hVc0kG " cinematic lens " (really good for about anything) - http://amzn.to/2h5J8HL Best Flashlight - http://amzn.to/2iawYeo Small flashlight (powerful ) - http://amzn.to/2hV22Q5 TRIPOD - http://amzn.to/2h5Lbf3 rode mic pro - http://amzn.to/2hV6caH BEST LAPTOP - http://amzn.to/2i4Qjlh Gloves - http://amzn.to/2hQ49Yl GOPRO 5 - http://amzn.to/2h5M0Vb S...

    published: 10 Jun 2017
  • Mexico City Earthquake 7.1 Sept 19 2017 View from the water

    Onlookers experience the Mexico City Earthquake in Puebla as the 7.1 rocks and sways people on a boat. This sept 19 2017 earthquake in mexico city is the second largest to hit in the month of Sept this year. Xochimilco 09-19-17 http://www.facebook.com/aliendisc

    published: 19 Sep 2017
  • The Water Canals Of Mexico City (Xochimilco) - Travel Couple VLOG #329

    Josh and Ashley visit Xochimilco water canals in Mexico city. The Way Away is Josh and Ashley Brown, husband and wife world travelers. Our mission is to bring the world closer by showing the uniqueness of our cultures and promoting unity around the world. Subscribe to our channel to watch our daily travel vlogs. Song: My Future by Artificial Music --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- SOCIAL: Twitter: http://twitter.com/wayawaymag Instagram: http://instagram.com/wayawaymag MAILING LIST: How To Pack 365 Days of Clothes Into 1 Carry On - http://thewayaway.com/cheat-sheet/ SUPPORT: Get $$ off Air BNB http://bit.ly/TWAairbnb Patreon: http://thewayaway.com/patreon Donate Direct: http://thewayaway.com/donate -------...

    published: 21 Apr 2017
  • Mexico City finds solutions for its water crisis

    In Mexico City, the most populated capital in the two Americas, vast swathes of the population have no direct access to water in their homes. Mexico's president Enrique Pena Nieto has described the problem as a national priority. The government is now working with civil engineers to solve the problem for a city which expanded far faster than urban planning could keep up with.

    published: 17 May 2014
  • Mexico City's water crisis

    At lest hundreds of thousands of residents of Mexico City, the capital of Mexico, are failing to receive a permanent water supply. It is a puzzling problem in a city the Aztecs built on five lakes and which consequently suffers annual flooding. Some analysts are saying that it is an example of the stark divide between rich and poor in the country. Authorities are promising changes to deal with the long-term problem, but soultions have not yet been seen. Al Jazeera's Rhodri Davies reports (20 April, 2010).

    published: 22 Apr 2010
  • Roger Waters - "Time" - Live in Mexico City, Oct. 2016

    "Time" from Mexico City in October 2016. A month until the Us + Them tour begins. Tickets and dates at http://rogerwaters.com The new album 'Is This the Life We Really Want?' now available for pre-order. Listen to "Smell the Roses" at http://smarturl.it/RogerWaters

    published: 25 Apr 2017
  • Mexico City, Parched and Sinking, Faces a Water Crisis 2017

    Mexico City, Parched and Sinking, Faces a Water Crisis MEXICO CITY — On bad days, you can smell the stench from a mile away, drifting over a nowhere sprawl of highways and office parks. When the Grand Canal was completed, at the end of the 1800s, it was Mexico City’s Brooklyn Bridge, a major feat of engineering and a symbol of civic pride: 29 miles long, with the ability to move tens of thousands of gallons of wastewater per second. It promised to solve the flooding and sewage problems that had plagued the city for centuries. Only it didn’t, pretty much from the start. The canal was based on gravity. And Mexico City, a mile and a half above sea level, was sinking, collapsing in on itself. It still is, faster and faster, and the canal is just one victim of what has become a vicious cycle...

    published: 17 Feb 2017
  • ABANDONED WATER PARK IN MEXICO CITY (ATLANTIS) w/ EXPLORING WITH JOSH & CODY

    This abandoned water park in Mexico City is one of the most requested locations I visit here in Mexico. I teamed up with my urbex friends Exploring with Josh and Exploring with Cody, and we headed to Bosque Chapultepec, a park (more like a forest) in the heart of CDMX to vlog the adventure together. This abandoned theme park has a dark history, and we wanted to learn more about it. It doesn’t look like it, but Atlantis was recently closed. It’s been less than 10 years since it shut it’s doors, yet it looks like a war zone. Being in the middle of such a big city, there have been lots of people come to do graffiti and explore, how it became so thrashed, I have no idea. It looks like it was half demolished. It was good to see the waterslides where still there, as well as some resemblance of ...

    published: 11 Jun 2017
  • Shantytowns in Mexico City have no access to running water

    In Mexico City's Outer suburbs, thousands of people don't have running water. Many have waited for years while the government has struggled to deliver water to nearly 21 million people in the area. CCTV's Martin Markovits reports.

    published: 22 Dec 2016
  • Mexico, most bottled water per person in the world

    CCTV America correspondent Ross Velton in Mexico City talks to the residents to discover why they drink bottled water instead of tap water. Velton also interviews Ramon Aquirre, Mexico City Water Authority to understand more.

    published: 06 Aug 2012
  • Mexico City Water Crisis

    News story about Mexico city and its growing water crisis suitable for KS2 children to view.

    published: 27 Sep 2016
  • MEXICO CITY WATER SHORTAGE!

    published: 14 Mar 2017
  • Mexico City Water

    Mexico city water problem and history.

    published: 15 Dec 2015
  • Gopro: Mexico City Water Park

    published: 13 Aug 2015
  • SOS 394: Mexico City Water Infrastructure

    published: 18 Apr 2016
  • Pecha Kucha: Mexico City's Water Crisis

    Pecha Kucha by Carly Segal: Mexico City's Water Crisis

    published: 20 Apr 2017
developed with YouTube
Crisis in Mexico's MEGACITY

Crisis in Mexico's MEGACITY

  • Order:
  • Duration: 9:07
  • Updated: 27 Jul 2017
  • views: 297692
videos
Mexico's vast capital — Ciudad de México, the largest city in the Americas — is under threat from a severe water crisis...and vulnerable to disasters like the earthquake that struck on September 19, 2017. Subscribe to TDC: https://www.youtube.com/TheDailyConversation/ More information here: http://nyti.ms/2kFT35m Video by Bryce Plank and Robin West Music from Motion Array's library Like TDC on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/thedailyconversation Follow TDC on http://www.twitter.com/thedailyconvo Transcript: What makes this place unique? It is the world’s largest city at an elevation higher than 2000 meters. With 21.2 million residents it rivals New York City for the title of largest metropolis in the Americas, and it is one of the world’s oldest continuously populated urban areas. But what truly sets this megalopolis apart is also its biggest challenge. It is the largest city on Earth without direct access to a significant body of water, although that wasn’t always the case. This is an examination of Mexico City and the water crisis that threatens its continued prosperity. Nearly seven centuries ago, the Aztecs came across an island in the middle of a lake, in a vast valley, more than 2,000 meters above sea level, hundreds of kilometers from the nearest coast. Three hundred years later, a small group of Spanish explorers led by Hernan Cortes arrived, and what they found was a thriving capital city, the heartbeat of the Aztec empire with 300,000 souls. It was called Tenochtitlan, and it amazed the Europeans. Its labyrinth of canals dividing a network of manmade islands reminded them of Venice, and they wanted it for themselves. [Dr. John Pohl] “There in the center of the lake was this gleaming white city, it was something they’d never seen before. And for us we can almost imagine it as Dorothy looking at Oz for the first time. It was far larger at a quarter of a million people than any city they’d ever seen in Europe.” Armed with superior weaponry — and the most powerful exterminating agent, disease — the Europeans wiped the Aztecs out and systematically dismantled their great temples and pyramids. Then, they set out to quickly build the most renowned city in the Americas. They rejected the Aztec way of living harmoniously with the land and, instead, filled their canals, destroyed their “floating farms,” and drained water from the lake until it was completely empty. This set the city on a collision course with nature. Over time, it has grown to cover the entire lakebed, and well beyond. And because two volcanos — one of them still active — loom over the city from the south, the soil is a mix of clay from the lake and volcanic rock. That’s an unusual foundation to build a sprawling, heavy, concrete jungle on—and it’s why the city is sinking. But people keep on arriving, because the defining feature of Mexico City is centralism, the idea that all paths lead here. What used to be trails converging on grassy highlands, became dirt roads used by carts and donkeys loaded with goods, and are now the arterial roads that move millions. The explosion of Mexico City’s population — like other megalopolises around the world — follows the widespread adoption of the motor vehicle. In 1950, its population was 3.1 million. As paved highways became more common, it jumped to 5.5 million by 1960, then it nearly tripled to 14 million inhabitants by 1980. This boom has exacerbated the city’s two most urgent challenges: bringing in enough water for twenty-one million people, while simultaneously sending away the millions of litres of wastewater they produce each day. The city is failing on both fronts. Now, it’s worth noting that crime is not Mexico City’s most pressing concern. It can be a dangerous place, but the reality is that - while the country has seen its murder rate rise as drug cartels battle for territory - the Federal District has some of the lowest crime rates in Mexico. It has installed more than 22,000 surveillance cameras throughout its 16 boroughs and put thousands more police officers on the street. Increased security keeps violent crime in check and creates opportunities for educated and artistically-inclined young people from the surrounding states. It’s a young, vibrant place with an economy that accounts for one-quarter of the country’s GDP while holding more than one-fifth of its population, that’s one of the highest capital-to-national ratios in the world. Centralism, remember? It’s neighborhoods are diverse, and flow endlessly into one another. One minute it feels like you’re in Paris, turn the corner and its Manhattan, but just a few streets over lie the rundown avenidas of Tijuana. Above all, it’s crowded. Mexico City is the most congested place in the world. Although it has an excellent, twelve line metro system that’s cheap enough for anyone to ride, its five million cars snarl the roadways on the streets above.
https://wn.com/Crisis_In_Mexico's_Megacity
Mexico City faces growing water crisis

Mexico City faces growing water crisis

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:32
  • Updated: 11 Nov 2014
  • views: 11669
videos
Mexico City, home to an inefficient and inconvenient water delivery system, struggles to meet the pressing demands of its 22 million residents. Some residents have turned to harvesting rainwater, which has its own set of limitations. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports on the barriers that keep residents from clean water.
https://wn.com/Mexico_City_Faces_Growing_Water_Crisis
Mexico City hit hard by water shortages

Mexico City hit hard by water shortages

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:19
  • Updated: 14 Mar 2017
  • views: 5678
videos
More than two million people have been affected by water shortages across Mexico’s capital. Ageing infrastructure and a booming population are forcing people to live along the hillsides around Mexico City as they are dependent on water that is driven in on trucks. There are also fears of more taps running dry as the hottest time of the year approaches. Al Jazeera’s David Mercer reports from Mexico City. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
https://wn.com/Mexico_City_Hit_Hard_By_Water_Shortages
Mexico City is Sinking

Mexico City is Sinking

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:09
  • Updated: 29 Feb 2016
  • views: 10945
videos
Mexico city is sinking because people are thirsty. The city has sunk dozens of feet in the last 60 years because 70 percent of the water people rely on is extracted from the aquifer below. This has caused buildings to lean and sink into the ground at a rate of up to one foot a year in the most extreme places. Fusion visited three historical sites in the city to learn more.
https://wn.com/Mexico_City_Is_Sinking
Roger Waters - "Pigs (Three Different Ones)"

Roger Waters - "Pigs (Three Different Ones)"

  • Order:
  • Duration: 11:40
  • Updated: 21 Jan 2017
  • views: 1953864
videos
The resistance begins today. Live from Zócalo Square - Mexico City - October 1, 2016
https://wn.com/Roger_Waters_Pigs_(Three_Different_Ones)
Mexico City struggles to provide public with clean water

Mexico City struggles to provide public with clean water

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:21
  • Updated: 23 Mar 2017
  • views: 272
videos
Every major country faces the challenge of providing safe, drinkable water to its cities. This struggle is greatly magnified in Mexico, home to one of the world's most vast megacities. CGTN's Franc Contreras reports from Mexico City.
https://wn.com/Mexico_City_Struggles_To_Provide_Public_With_Clean_Water
Mexico City Water

Mexico City Water

  • Order:
  • Duration: 12:29
  • Updated: 15 Dec 2015
  • views: 176
videos
Mexico city water problem and history.
https://wn.com/Mexico_City_Water
Mexico City is Sinking | Channel One News

Mexico City is Sinking | Channel One News

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:42
  • Updated: 27 Sep 2016
  • views: 12331
videos
Tom Hanson fills us in as Mexico City faces a big problem. For more Channel One News updates subscribe to Channel One News: https://www.youtube.com/user/ChannelOneNews Visit the Channel One News Website: http://www.channelone.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ChannelOneNews/ Twitter: @ChannelOneNews Instagram: @channelonenews Channel One News is the leading news program for young people across the country. Now in its 27th season, the dynamic, daily news show covers domestic and international news stories from a relevant young person’s perspective. Teachers: For daily, supplementary curriculum content tied to each day’s show and access to our video library of more than 2,200 videos, head over to http://www.channelone.com/subscribe/.
https://wn.com/Mexico_City_Is_Sinking_|_Channel_One_News
Tenochtitlan (The Impossible City)

Tenochtitlan (The Impossible City)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:22
  • Updated: 08 Jan 2011
  • views: 425586
videos
Tenochtitlan was a city-state located on an island in Lake Texcoco in the Valley of Mexico. Founded in 1325, it became the seat of the growing Aztec Empire in the 15th century, until it was captured by the Spanish in 1521. Today the ruins of Tenochtitlan are located in the central part of Mexico City.
https://wn.com/Tenochtitlan_(The_Impossible_City)
Sewer Diving in Mexico City - Supersized Earth - Episode 1 - BBC One

Sewer Diving in Mexico City - Supersized Earth - Episode 1 - BBC One

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:27
  • Updated: 24 Nov 2012
  • views: 58202
videos
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0114dtq Mexico City is in danger of drowning in its own filth. Dallas joins one of the men responsible for keeping its sewers flowing freely.
https://wn.com/Sewer_Diving_In_Mexico_City_Supersized_Earth_Episode_1_BBC_One
Sewer Diving | National Geographic

Sewer Diving | National Geographic

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:44
  • Updated: 01 Sep 2009
  • views: 437336
videos
Meet the man who swims through human excrement, toxic waste, and rotting cadavers to keep Mexico's wastewater where it belongs. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta Sewer Diving | National Geographic https://youtu.be/TlRjbV-rT-E National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
https://wn.com/Sewer_Diving_|_National_Geographic
Mexico City's water farms

Mexico City's water farms

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:27
  • Updated: 21 Nov 2013
  • views: 751
videos
► Subscribe to the Financial Times on YouTube: http://bit.ly/FTimeSubs Small producers are growing crops in fertile soil around the city's ancient waterways. Deborah Bonello reports. Special report: http://www.ft.com/reports/future-food-industry For more video content from the Financial Times, visit http://www.FT.com/video Subscribe to the Financial Times on YouTube; http://goo.gl/vUQx5k Twitter https://twitter.com/ftvideo Facebook https://www.facebook.com/financialtimes
https://wn.com/Mexico_City's_Water_Farms
Mexico City's tap water made me sick

Mexico City's tap water made me sick

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:52
  • Updated: 14 Nov 2013
  • views: 1398
videos
http://preparetoserve.com/MEXICO Mexico City's tap water made me sick. Sometimes tourists or foreigners get sick when drinking the water in Latin American countries. Their water is now always treated the same way as in the United States.
https://wn.com/Mexico_City's_Tap_Water_Made_Me_Sick
Abandoned Water Park Atlantis - Mexico City !

Abandoned Water Park Atlantis - Mexico City !

  • Order:
  • Duration: 12:36
  • Updated: 10 Jun 2017
  • views: 188185
videos
Follow mike! https://www.youtube.com/user/friskyb music - http://www.epidemicsound.com/ FOLLOW MY SOCIAL MEDIA facebook = https://www.facebook.com/exploringwithjosh Snapchat = exploringjosh Twitter = https://twitter.com/i_am_joshyo instagram = https://www.instagram.com/exploringwithjosh !!!! MY GEAR !!!! MY BACKPACK - http://amzn.to/2ifBf0f MY Camera ( a7s2 ) - http://amzn.to/2hPVRji MAIN Lens to vlog with - http://amzn.to/2hVc0kG " cinematic lens " (really good for about anything) - http://amzn.to/2h5J8HL Best Flashlight - http://amzn.to/2iawYeo Small flashlight (powerful ) - http://amzn.to/2hV22Q5 TRIPOD - http://amzn.to/2h5Lbf3 rode mic pro - http://amzn.to/2hV6caH BEST LAPTOP - http://amzn.to/2i4Qjlh Gloves - http://amzn.to/2hQ49Yl GOPRO 5 - http://amzn.to/2h5M0Vb Samsung 360 camera - http://amzn.to/2iaJFGg Scarf - http://amzn.to/2h5KAdh Follow the Exploring Crew! Exploring Crew:http://www.youtube.com/c/exploringcrew CODY:https://www.youtube.com/SirCodyBuffinton STEVE:https://www.youtube.com/sunsteprising JOHN: https://www.youtube.com/ishhjohn JOSH: http://youtube.com/theartofrealitycrew
https://wn.com/Abandoned_Water_Park_Atlantis_Mexico_City
Mexico City Earthquake 7.1 Sept 19 2017 View from the water

Mexico City Earthquake 7.1 Sept 19 2017 View from the water

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:55
  • Updated: 19 Sep 2017
  • views: 9480
videos
Onlookers experience the Mexico City Earthquake in Puebla as the 7.1 rocks and sways people on a boat. This sept 19 2017 earthquake in mexico city is the second largest to hit in the month of Sept this year. Xochimilco 09-19-17 http://www.facebook.com/aliendisc
https://wn.com/Mexico_City_Earthquake_7.1_Sept_19_2017_View_From_The_Water
The Water Canals Of Mexico City (Xochimilco) - Travel Couple VLOG #329

The Water Canals Of Mexico City (Xochimilco) - Travel Couple VLOG #329

  • Order:
  • Duration: 15:19
  • Updated: 21 Apr 2017
  • views: 13016
videos
Josh and Ashley visit Xochimilco water canals in Mexico city. The Way Away is Josh and Ashley Brown, husband and wife world travelers. Our mission is to bring the world closer by showing the uniqueness of our cultures and promoting unity around the world. Subscribe to our channel to watch our daily travel vlogs. Song: My Future by Artificial Music --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- SOCIAL: Twitter: http://twitter.com/wayawaymag Instagram: http://instagram.com/wayawaymag MAILING LIST: How To Pack 365 Days of Clothes Into 1 Carry On - http://thewayaway.com/cheat-sheet/ SUPPORT: Get $$ off Air BNB http://bit.ly/TWAairbnb Patreon: http://thewayaway.com/patreon Donate Direct: http://thewayaway.com/donate ------------------------------------OUR GEAR ---------------------------------- Panasonic GH5 http://amzn.to/2lXlKQ2 Lumix G 12-35mm f2.8 (lens) http://amzn.to/2lXpfGj DJI Mavic (drone) http://amzn.to/2kYC1oq Røde VideoMicro http://amzn.to/2mqV6wD GoPro Hero 5 Black http://amzn.to/2lcsTrw Apple MacBook Pro http://amzn.to/2lSQWjb LaCie Rugged External Hard drive http://amzn.to/2mqQPt4 Dolica tripod http://amzn.to/2my9Etd
https://wn.com/The_Water_Canals_Of_Mexico_City_(Xochimilco)_Travel_Couple_Vlog_329
Mexico City finds solutions for its water crisis

Mexico City finds solutions for its water crisis

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:51
  • Updated: 17 May 2014
  • views: 1393
videos
In Mexico City, the most populated capital in the two Americas, vast swathes of the population have no direct access to water in their homes. Mexico's president Enrique Pena Nieto has described the problem as a national priority. The government is now working with civil engineers to solve the problem for a city which expanded far faster than urban planning could keep up with.
https://wn.com/Mexico_City_Finds_Solutions_For_Its_Water_Crisis
Mexico City's water crisis

Mexico City's water crisis

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:53
  • Updated: 22 Apr 2010
  • views: 5926
videos
At lest hundreds of thousands of residents of Mexico City, the capital of Mexico, are failing to receive a permanent water supply. It is a puzzling problem in a city the Aztecs built on five lakes and which consequently suffers annual flooding. Some analysts are saying that it is an example of the stark divide between rich and poor in the country. Authorities are promising changes to deal with the long-term problem, but soultions have not yet been seen. Al Jazeera's Rhodri Davies reports (20 April, 2010).
https://wn.com/Mexico_City's_Water_Crisis
Roger Waters - "Time" - Live in Mexico City, Oct. 2016

Roger Waters - "Time" - Live in Mexico City, Oct. 2016

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:21
  • Updated: 25 Apr 2017
  • views: 585996
videos
"Time" from Mexico City in October 2016. A month until the Us + Them tour begins. Tickets and dates at http://rogerwaters.com The new album 'Is This the Life We Really Want?' now available for pre-order. Listen to "Smell the Roses" at http://smarturl.it/RogerWaters
https://wn.com/Roger_Waters_Time_Live_In_Mexico_City,_Oct._2016
Mexico City, Parched and Sinking, Faces a Water Crisis 2017

Mexico City, Parched and Sinking, Faces a Water Crisis 2017

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:18
  • Updated: 17 Feb 2017
  • views: 530
videos
Mexico City, Parched and Sinking, Faces a Water Crisis MEXICO CITY — On bad days, you can smell the stench from a mile away, drifting over a nowhere sprawl of highways and office parks. When the Grand Canal was completed, at the end of the 1800s, it was Mexico City’s Brooklyn Bridge, a major feat of engineering and a symbol of civic pride: 29 miles long, with the ability to move tens of thousands of gallons of wastewater per second. It promised to solve the flooding and sewage problems that had plagued the city for centuries. Only it didn’t, pretty much from the start. The canal was based on gravity. And Mexico City, a mile and a half above sea level, was sinking, collapsing in on itself. It still is, faster and faster, and the canal is just one victim of what has become a vicious cycle. Always short of water, Mexico City keeps drilling deeper for more, weakening the ancient clay lake beds on which the Aztecs first built much of the city, causing it to crumble even further. It is a cycle made worse by climate change. More heat and drought mean more evaporation and yet more demand for water, adding pressure to tap distant reservoirs at staggering costs or further drain underground aquifers and hasten the city’s collapse. In the immense neighborhood of Iztapalapa — where nearly two million people live, many of them unable to count on water from their taps — a teenager was swallowed up where a crack in the brittle ground split open a street. Sidewalks resemble broken china, and 15 elementary schools have crumbled or caved in. Much is being written about climate change and the impact of rising seas on waterfront populations. But coasts are not the only places affected. Mexico City — high in the mountains, in the center of the country — is a glaring example. The world has a lot invested in crowded capitals like this one, with vast numbers of people, huge economies and the stability of a hemisphere at risk. Changing Climate, Changing Cities The first in a series of articles about how climate change is challenging the world’s urban centers. One study predicts that 10 percent of Mexicans ages 15 to 65 could eventually try to emigrate north as a result of rising temperatures, drought and floods, potentially scattering millions of people and heightening already extreme political tensions over immigration. The effects of climate change are varied and opportunistic, but one thing is consistent: They are like sparks in the tinder. They expose cities’ biggest vulnerabilities, inflaming troubles that politicians and city planners often ignore or try to paper over. And they spread outward, defying borders. That’s what this series is about — how global cities tackle climate threats, or fail to. Around the world, extreme weather and water scarcity are accelerating repression, regional conflicts and violence. A Columbia University report found that where rainfall declines, “the risk of a low-level conflict escalating to a full-scale civil war approximately doubles the following year.” The Pentagon’s term for climate change is “threat multiplier.” And nowhere does this apply more obviously than in cities. This is the first urban century in human history, the first time more people live in cities than don’t, with predictions that three-quarters of the global population will be urban by 2050. By that time, according to another study, there may be more than 700 million climate refugees on the move. For many cities around the world, adapting to climate change is a route to long-term prosperity. That’s the good news, where societies are willing to listen. But adaptation can also be costly and slow. It can run counter to the rhythms of political campaigns and headlong into powerful, entrenched interests, confounding business as usual. This is, in effect, what happened in New Orleans, which ignored countless warning signs, destroyed natural protections, gave developers a free pass and failed to reinforce levees before Hurricane Katrina left much of the city in ruins. Unlike traffic jams or crime, climate change isn’t something most people easily feel or see. It is certainly not what residents in Mexico City talk about every day. But it is like an approaching storm, straining an already precarious social fabric and threatening to push a great city toward a breaking point. As Arnoldo Kramer, Mexico City’s chief resilience officer, put it: “Climate change has become the biggest long-term threat to this city’s future. And that’s because it is linked to water, health, air pollution, traffic disruption from floods, housing vulnerability to landslides — which means we can’t begin to address any of the city’s real problems without facing the climate issue.” There’s much more at stake than this city’s well being. At the extreme, if climate change wreaks havoc on the social and economic fabric of global linchpins like Mexico City,
https://wn.com/Mexico_City,_Parched_And_Sinking,_Faces_A_Water_Crisis_2017
ABANDONED WATER PARK IN MEXICO CITY (ATLANTIS) w/ EXPLORING WITH JOSH & CODY

ABANDONED WATER PARK IN MEXICO CITY (ATLANTIS) w/ EXPLORING WITH JOSH & CODY

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  • Duration: 9:15
  • Updated: 11 Jun 2017
  • views: 10571
videos
This abandoned water park in Mexico City is one of the most requested locations I visit here in Mexico. I teamed up with my urbex friends Exploring with Josh and Exploring with Cody, and we headed to Bosque Chapultepec, a park (more like a forest) in the heart of CDMX to vlog the adventure together. This abandoned theme park has a dark history, and we wanted to learn more about it. It doesn’t look like it, but Atlantis was recently closed. It’s been less than 10 years since it shut it’s doors, yet it looks like a war zone. Being in the middle of such a big city, there have been lots of people come to do graffiti and explore, how it became so thrashed, I have no idea. It looks like it was half demolished. It was good to see the waterslides where still there, as well as some resemblance of what the wave pool used to be like, I had heard you could find tickets, but I didn't come across any. Too much garbage on the ground. A couple years ago news stories started circulating about seals and dolphins being kept in bad conditions inside the forgotten park. Helicopter footage (shown in the beginning of the video) shows green water, and live animals still living inside after the doors had closed. This rumour still circulates though Mexico City, and this was one of the prime reasons we wanted to explore. Would we still find animals there? Are the rumours true? It was scary to think that they might be. ----------------------------------------­­­--------------------------------------­-­-­--------------- ϟ My Camera Gear ϟ Main Camera: http://geni.us/MyCamera My Favourite Lens: http://geni.us/Sony1635mm My 2nd Favourite Lens: http://geni.us/Sony90mm Low Light/Portrait Lens: http://geni.us/Sony55mm Love this Microphone: http://geni.us/RODEMic My SD Cards: http://geni.us/SanDiskPRO Camera Clips: http://geni.us/PDClip Cool Gadget to switch Lenses: http://geni.us/PDLensKit My Camera Strap: http://geni.us/PDStrap Keeping Safe on Rainy Days: http://geni.us/PDRainShell Great Tripod with a Funny Name: http://geni.us/Tripod This new Gimbal I love: http://geni.us/NewGimbal My Flying Camera: http://geni.us/DJI4K ----------------------------------------­­­--------------------------------------­-­-­--------------- ♥ Friends ♥ Exploring with Josh: https://www.youtube.com/user/theartofrealitycrew Exploring with Cody: https://www.youtube.com/user/SirCodyBuffinton ----------------------------------------­­­--------------------------------------­-­-­--------------- ♫ Music ♫ “Life in Tinsel Town" - Magnus Ringbloom "Getting Tipsy 2" - Martin Landh from Epidemic Sound (http://www.epidemicsound.com) "Clayton" - BeatheBeat ----------------------------------------­­­--------------------------------------­-­-­--------------- ☎ Say Hi Here ☎ ✧ Snapchat: kickthegrind ✧ Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/kickthegrind ✧ Tweetz: http://www.twitter.com/KickTheGrind ✧ Facebook Fanpage: http://www.facebook.com/KicktheGrindTV ----------------------------------------­­­--------------------------------------­-­-­--------------- ✯ Experiences over PossessionsKick the Grind ✯ ----------------------------------------­­­--------------------------------------­-­-­---------------
https://wn.com/Abandoned_Water_Park_In_Mexico_City_(Atlantis)_W_Exploring_With_Josh_Cody
Shantytowns in Mexico City have no access to running water

Shantytowns in Mexico City have no access to running water

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  • Duration: 2:33
  • Updated: 22 Dec 2016
  • views: 179
videos
In Mexico City's Outer suburbs, thousands of people don't have running water. Many have waited for years while the government has struggled to deliver water to nearly 21 million people in the area. CCTV's Martin Markovits reports.
https://wn.com/Shantytowns_In_Mexico_City_Have_No_Access_To_Running_Water
Mexico, most bottled water per person in the world

Mexico, most bottled water per person in the world

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  • Duration: 2:08
  • Updated: 06 Aug 2012
  • views: 760
videos
CCTV America correspondent Ross Velton in Mexico City talks to the residents to discover why they drink bottled water instead of tap water. Velton also interviews Ramon Aquirre, Mexico City Water Authority to understand more.
https://wn.com/Mexico,_Most_Bottled_Water_Per_Person_In_The_World
Mexico City Water Crisis

Mexico City Water Crisis

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  • Duration: 6:57
  • Updated: 27 Sep 2016
  • views: 260
videos
News story about Mexico city and its growing water crisis suitable for KS2 children to view.
https://wn.com/Mexico_City_Water_Crisis
MEXICO CITY WATER SHORTAGE!

MEXICO CITY WATER SHORTAGE!

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  • Duration: 2:19
  • Updated: 14 Mar 2017
  • views: 31
videos
https://wn.com/Mexico_City_Water_Shortage
Mexico City Water

Mexico City Water

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  • Duration: 12:29
  • Updated: 15 Dec 2015
  • views: 121
videos
Mexico city water problem and history.
https://wn.com/Mexico_City_Water
Gopro: Mexico City Water Park

Gopro: Mexico City Water Park

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  • Duration: 0:21
  • Updated: 13 Aug 2015
  • views: 230
videos
https://wn.com/Gopro_Mexico_City_Water_Park
SOS 394: Mexico City Water Infrastructure

SOS 394: Mexico City Water Infrastructure

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  • Duration: 8:05
  • Updated: 18 Apr 2016
  • views: 34
videos
https://wn.com/Sos_394_Mexico_City_Water_Infrastructure
Pecha Kucha: Mexico City's Water Crisis

Pecha Kucha: Mexico City's Water Crisis

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  • Duration: 7:59
  • Updated: 20 Apr 2017
  • views: 24
videos https://wn.com/Pecha_Kucha_Mexico_City's_Water_Crisis